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Learn github.com

A roadmap to becoming an AI expert in 2020

Below you find a set of charts demonstrating the paths that you can take and the technologies that you would want to adopt in order to become a data scientist, machine learning or an ai expert. We made these charts for our new employees to make them AI Experts but we wanted to share them here to help the community.

I didn’t embed the roadmap images because they are too many and too vertical to fit. It sound like an interactive version is Coming Soon™️, but don’t wait on that to get started here. 2020 is almost over. 😉

Learn jemma.dev

Only two hours to learn an entire language?!...Challenge accepted!

I had no idea…have you ever read awk’s entire manual? How long did it take you?

The other day, I was watching Bryan Cantrill’s 2018 talk, Rust, and Other Interesting Things, and he made an offhanded comment while discussing values of different programming languages and communities. He said, “If you get the awk programming language manual…you’ll read it in about two hours and then you’re done. That’s it. You know all of awk.”

Only two hours to learn an entire language?! …. Challenge accepted!

Ruby learnbyexample.github.io

Ruby one-liners cookbook

Ruby is my favorite tool for slightly-longer-than-one-liners, but I don’t often reach for it directly from the command line. This little cookbook might change my mind on that:

A shell utility like bash provides built-in commands and scripting features to make it easier to solve and automate various tasks. External *nix commands like grep, sed, awk, sort, find, parallel etc can be combined to work with each other. Depending upon your familiarity with those tools, you can either use ruby as a single replacement or complement them for specific use cases.

Sean DuBois webrtcforthecurious.com

WebRTC for the Curious 📘

A new CC0 book about WebRTC by Sean DuBois (and friends). Sean recently shared his love for and deep knowledge about the technology on our Go Time podcast.

This book was created by WebRTC implementers to share their hard-earned knowledge with the world. WebRTC for the curious is an Open Source book written for those that are always looking for more. This book doesn’t settle for abstraction.

This book is all about protocols and APIs, and will not be talking about any software in particular. We attempt to summarize RFCs and get all undocumented knowledge into one place. This is book is not a tutorial, and will not contain much code.

This is very much a WIP, but there’s a fair bit ready for consumption and the authors are actively collaborating in the GitHub repo.

Shubheksha Jalan shubheksha.com

How to start reviewing code

Code review is critical to being a software engineer yet there aren’t many resources on how to build up the skill. That’s why Shubheksha wrote what she learned when she first started making the mental shift from writing code to reviewing it.

Remember to be kind and empathetic — Code reviews are very ripe for misunderstanding and lack of empathy on either side. At the heart of code reviews is collaboration. It is as important to remind yourself as a reviewer that you’re reviewing someone’s code and not passing judgments on them as a person and it is equally important to remember that whatever your reviewer tells you is not meant as a personal attack.

Music helen.blog

What software teams can learn from music masterclasses

Musicians and developers go together like peas and carrots, Jenny. So it makes sense that techniques used by musicians to hone their skills might transfer over to software people. One of those techniques is the “masterclass”

A masterclass is a format in which musicians perform a work for an established artist and the artist then gives them feedback rather like a lesson, except that all of this happens in front of an audience.

Click through for a compelling distillation of what software teams can learn from musicians when it comes to giving and receiving feedback.

Stephanie Morillo stephaniemorillo.co

A Brief introduction to technical writing

Stephanie Morillo:

Developers encounter technical writing everywhere: product & API docs, manpages, tutorials & more. We know it matters but what is technical writing exactly? And how does it differ from other writing?

In this brief post, I define what technical writing is, provide examples of technical writing in software and beyond, and explore other skills technical writers must develop to create successful and effective documentation.

Nikola Đuza pragmaticpineapple.com

Why learn Vim in 2020?

Nikola Đuza makes a compelling case for the powerful text editor that developers love (or love to hate):

What Vim is excellent at is navigating, making some changes, and repeating the process. The process most call editing (not to be confused with writing). Most developers tend to overlook this fact, but this is one of the strong selling points of Vim. Developers are more prone to reading code, jumping from file to file, making small incisions in the code, and writing code all the time.

Jordan Lewis jordanlewis.org

How to run a live coding stream (on Twitch using OBS)

Jordan Lewis shared his end-to-end setup to run a live coding stream. He covers all the things — OBS configuration, stream alerts, channel setup, chatbot, becoming a Twitch affiliate…

If you’re reading this post, you might be interested in trying your hand at live coding on stream, as a way of sharing your projects in a more relatable, immediate way than a polished blog post, teaching others about programming, or just as a way to have fun. I think that live coding and streams in general are an interesting possible future form of both education and entertainment, and if you’re contemplating starting your own stream, I sincerely hope that you do it.

How to run a live coding stream (on Twitch using OBS)
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