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Aymen github.com

A Gentle introduction to Kubernetes with more than just the basics

In this workshop, we’re going to: Deploy Kubernetes services and an Ambassador API gateway. Examine the difference between Kubernetes proxies and service mesh like Istio. Access the Kubernetes API from the outside and from a Pod. Understand what API to choose. See how Service Accounts and RBAC works Discover some security pitfalls when building Docker images and many interesting things. Other things :-)

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Data visualization research.hackerrank.com

HackerRank's 2018 student developer report

There are some fascinating results in this study put out by HackerRank where they surveyed 10,351 student developers. One example that shows a growing trend in developer ed: University students today seem to be showing less interest in Stack Overflow compared to professional developers. Instead, YouTube is starting to become more favorable as a learning tool for the next generation of developers. We found that 73% of students use YouTube, compared to only 64% of professional developers (where the majority of professional developers were aged 25-34, and the majority of student developers were aged 18-24). A little less surprising, but still good to know for those breaking in to the scene: There’s a big opportunity for student developers to learn JavaScript and JavaScript-focused frameworks. Employers need it more than any other skill. As the direction for web applications have moved from static to dynamic, JavaScript has become increasingly dominant in the industry. In fact, 95% of web applications are built on JavaScript—so it’s hard to ignore the disconnect. This is a really well done report. 👌

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Yaron Wittenstein Medium

The importance of unlearning

Yaron Wittenstein: The world of software is constantly changing at a very fast pace. Yesterday’s axioms might be tomorrow’s anti-patterns. Newborn technologies rise to popularity only to become obsolete sooner than expected and hardware advancements make things that were considered science-fiction a few years ago possible. The only certainty is that we don’t know what the future will bring us. One mantra in this industry is always-be-learning. A message we don’t communicate well enough, however, is how you also have to be willing to let go of once-useful-but-now-limiting knowledge.

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Jef Spaleta blog.sensu.io

How Kubernetes works

If you’ve ever wondered why exactly Kubernetes is a thing OR wondered what the root problem is that Kubernetes solves, then this post from Jef Spaleta is for you. For organizations that operate at a massive scale, a single Linux container instance isn’t enough to satisfy all of their applications’ needs. It’s not uncommon for sufficiently complex applications, such as ones that communicate through microservices, to require multiple Linux containers that communicate with each other. That architecture introduces a new scaling problem: how do you manage all those individual containers? …Enter Kubernetes, a container orchestration system — a way to manage the lifecycle of containerized applications across an entire fleet.

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Jan Meppe janmeppe.com

Regex for noobs (like me!)

This is a great introduction to that regex magic! This blog post is an illustrated guide to regex and aims to provide a gentle introduction for people who never have fiddled with regex, want to, but are kind of intimidated by the whole thing. If you understand regex it suddenly becomes this super fast and powerful tool … but you first need to understand it, and honestly I find it a bit intimidating for newcomers!

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Smashing Magazine Icon Smashing Magazine

Improve your JavaScript knowledge by reading source code

One of the most amazing things about Open Source is how much it enables you to learn from the best. Just open up the source for your favorite library or framework and you can start learning from the best in the business. But that can feel intimidating. This article breaks down some approaches you can use to make it easier. As author Carl Mungazi says: Reading source code is difficult at first but as with anything, it becomes easier with time. The goal is not to understand everything but to come away with a different perspective and new knowledge. The key is to be deliberate about the entire process and intensely curious about everything.

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Julio Biason blog.juliobiason.net

Things I learnt the hard way (in 30 years of software development)

I just started reading this (estimated read time: 34 minutes) and I have to say there are some really great tips inside. This one on code comments is pure gold: If you have no idea how to start, describe the flow of the application in high level, pure English/your language first. Then fill the spaces between comments with the code. Better yet: think of every comment as a function, then write the function that does exactly that. Julio warns that many of his learnings are cynical, but it’s gotta be hard to not be cynical after 30 years in this industry…

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Henning Jacobs github.com

Kubernetes failure/horror stories

Learn from other people’s fail stories. This is a compiled list of public Kubernetes failure stories. Why? Kubernetes is a fairly complex system with many moving parts. Its ecosystem is constantly evolving and adding even more layers (service mesh, …) to the mix. Considering this environment, we don’t hear enough real-world horror stories to learn from each other! This compilation of failure stories should make it easier for people dealing with Kubernetes operations (SRE, Ops, platform/infrastructure teams) to learn from others and reduce the unknown unknowns of running Kubernetes in production. For more information, see the blog post.

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Monica Lent monicalent.com

7 absolute truths I unlearned as junior developer

This is a great set of insights about being a developer and the software industry. It’s so easy when you’re first getting into something to have unrealistic expectations or idealistic beliefs. Articles like this help pull back the curtain and show what it’s really like. Author Monica Lent describes what a junior developer can get from this post: Maybe you’ll find something here you currently believe, and get inspired to learn more about it and why the topic is so multi-faceted. Or maybe you’ll find this post encouraging because you’re already so far ahead of where I was at your stage.

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Kevin Ball zendev.com

Top 5 skills to learn as a junior JavaScript developer

Inspired by JSParty #77, a breakdown of 5 of the top skills for junior JavaScript developers to learn. My personal favorite point is this one on the importance of looking for bigger picture patterns: One of the great things about front-end development in 2019 is that despite the abundance of frameworks, we’ve also started to see some big megatrends that are true across frameworks. This is good news for developers because it means that as you go deep in one framework you can still pick up skills that will translate to others if need be.

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Gergely Orosz blog.pragmaticengineer.com

Undervalued software engineering skills? Writing well.

Being able to communicate and write well often plays out to being a huge asset in a career. But how does that works for software engineers? Gergely Orosz writes on his personal blog: For software engineers, writing becomes the tool to reach, converse with and influence engineers and teams outside their immediate peers. Writing becomes essential to make thoughts, tradeoffs and decisions durable. Writing things downs makes these thoughts available for a wide range of people to read.

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Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

Random Forests for complete beginners

Victor Zhou has been killin’ it lately with these explainers: In my opinion, most Machine Learning tutorials aren’t beginner-friendly enough. Last month, I wrote an introduction to Neural Networks for complete beginners. This post will adopt the same strategy, meaning it again assumes ZERO prior knowledge of machine learning. We’ll learn what Random Forests are and how they work from the ground up.

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Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Dave Cheney's "High Performance Go" workshop docs

If you haven’t attended the workshop directly, the next best thing is to learn indirectly by reading the workshop’s docs. The goal for this workshop is to give you the tools you need to diagnose performance problems in your Go applications and fix them. It’s licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license and the source is on GitHub.

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Damian Gryski github.com

Practices for writing high-performance Go

From writing and optimizing Go code to common gotchas with the Go standard library, Damian Gryski shared his thoughts on Go performance optimization and outlined best practices for writing high-performance Go code. Available in English, 中文, and Español. When and where to optimize — Every optimization has a cost. Generally this cost is expressed in terms of code complexity or cognitive load – optimized code is rarely simpler than the unoptimized version. But there’s another side that I’ll call the economics of optimization. As a programmer, your time is valuable. There’s the opportunity cost of what else you could be working on for your project, which bugs to fix, which features to add. Optimizing things is fun, but it’s not always the right task to choose. Performance is a feature, but so is shipping, and so is correctness.

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