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Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

Random Forests for complete beginners

Victor Zhou has been killin’ it lately with these explainers: In my opinion, most Machine Learning tutorials aren’t beginner-friendly enough. Last month, I wrote an introduction to Neural Networks for complete beginners. This post will adopt the same strategy, meaning it again assumes ZERO prior knowledge of machine learning. We’ll learn what Random Forests are and how they work from the ground up.

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Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Dave Cheney's "High Performance Go" workshop docs

If you haven’t attended the workshop directly, the next best thing is to learn indirectly by reading the workshop’s docs. The goal for this workshop is to give you the tools you need to diagnose performance problems in your Go applications and fix them. It’s licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license and the source is on GitHub.

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Damian Gryski github.com

Practices for writing high-performance Go

From writing and optimizing Go code to common gotchas with the Go standard library, Damian Gryski shared his thoughts on Go performance optimization and outlined best practices for writing high-performance Go code. Available in English, 中文, and Español. When and where to optimize — Every optimization has a cost. Generally this cost is expressed in terms of code complexity or cognitive load – optimized code is rarely simpler than the unoptimized version. But there’s another side that I’ll call the economics of optimization. As a programmer, your time is valuable. There’s the opportunity cost of what else you could be working on for your project, which bugs to fix, which features to add. Optimizing things is fun, but it’s not always the right task to choose. Performance is a feature, but so is shipping, and so is correctness.

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Sergiy Kukunin habr.com

The pros and cons of Elixir

In this short Q&A, Sergiy Kukunin, an Elixir expert, shares his thoughts on why Elixir is becoming so popular, its core advantages, and its drawbacks. Sergiy also shared this as a takeaway to getting started with Elixir. …the syntax of Elixir has some things in common with Ruby. The languages are entirely different, but it is always good to see symbols and elements you are used to. The simplest thing is to use some of the new Elixir-compatible web-development frameworks. The most popular web framework for Elixir is Phoenix. You should definitely give it a try, especially if you are used to using Ruby on Rails. This will simplify development while still making the app faster and more reliable.

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Simon Willison simonwillison.net

Running Datasette on Glitch

We talked with Simon Willison about Datasette on The Changelog #296. For the uninitiated, Datasette is an awesome tool for exploring and publishing data, and now you can play with it on Glitch. The worst part of any software project is setting up a development environment. It’s by far the biggest barrier for anyone trying to get started learning to code. I’ve been a developer for more than twenty years and I still feel the pain any time I want to do something new. Glitch is the most promising attempt I’ve ever seen at tackling this problem. This evening I decided to get Datasette running on it. I’m really impressed with how well it works, and I think Glitch provides an excellent environment for experimenting with Datasette and related tools.

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Chris Coyier CSS-Tricks

Using Netlify functions to send emails with a JAMstack-style site

How do you send email from a JAMstack-style site? Chris Coyer writes on CSS-Tricks: Let’s say you’re rocking a JAMstack-style site (no server-side languages in use), but you want to do something rather dynamic like send an email. Not a problem! That’s the whole point of JAMstack. It’s not just static hosting. It’s that plus doing anything else you wanna do through JavaScript and APIs. Here’s the setup…

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Go github.com

A roadmap to becoming a Go developer in 2019

The purpose of this roadmap is to give you an idea about the landscape. The road map will guide you if you are confused about what to learn next, rather than encouraging you to pick what is hip and trendy. You should grow some understanding of why one tool would be better suited for some cases than the other and remember hip and trendy does not always mean best suited for the job

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Ryan Palo assertnotmagic.com

Short circuiting in Bash

Learn from Ryan Palo about the super-powers of the “short-circuit” policy in Bash. In Bash, the && and || (AND and OR) operators work via a “short-circuit” policy. if [[ "$1" -gt 5 ]] && [[ "$1" -lt 10 ]]; then This checks the first condition. If the first condition is true, then there’s a possibility the whole thing could be true, so it checks the second condition. If the second condition is true, then the whole thing is true! However, if the first condition is false, then there’s no reason to check the second condition, because the whole thing could never possibly be true with the first one false.

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Thorsten Ball thorstenball.com

Learn more programming languages, even if you won't use them

Thorsten Ball writes on his personal blog: Different programming languages are good at different things and bad at others. Each one makes certain things easier and in turn others harder. Depending on what we want to do we can save ourselves a lot of work by choosing the language that makes solving the type of problem we’re facing the easiest. That’s one of the tangible, no-nonsense benefits of learning more languages. You put another tool in your toolbox and when the time comes you’re able to choose the best one. But I would go even one step further. I think it’s valuable to learn new programming languages even if — here it comes — you never take them out of the box. But why? Languages shape the way we think, each in their own peculiar way. That’s true for programming languages as well…

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Hamel Husain towardsdatascience.com

How to automate tasks on GitHub with machine learning for fun and profit

This is an explainer on how to build a GitHub App that predicts and applies issue labels using Tensorflow and public datasets. Hamel Husain writes: In order to show you how to create your own apps, we will walk you through the process of creating a GitHub app that can automatically label issues. Note that all of the code for this app, including the model training steps are located in this GitHub repository. See also: Issue Label Bot

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Quantum computing quantum.country

Quantum computing for the very curious

A fabulous introduction to Quantum computing: Learning this material is challenging. Quantum computing and quantum mechanics are famously “hard” subjects, often presented as mysterious and forbidding. If this were a conventional essay, chances are that you’d rapidly forget the material. But the essay is also an experiment in the essay form… the essay incorporates new user interface ideas to help you remember what you read. Parts 2 and 3 coming soon. ⌛

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Dhawal Shah freeCodeCamp

570 free online programming & computer science courses

Get your free learning on! Dhawal Shah, founder of Class Central , writes for freeCodeCamp: Seven years ago, universities like MIT and Stanford first opened up free online courses to the public. Today, more than 850 schools around the world have created thousands of free online courses, popularly known as Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs. I’ve compiled this list of 550 such free online courses that you can start in March. For this, I leveraged Class Central’s database of over 11,000 online courses. I’ve also included each course’s average rating.

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Nathan Pitzer find.xyz

Product-building articles by PMs at major tech companies

This is a treasure trove of product development articles by product managers at major tech companies. 1000+ articles recommended/written by PMs at Google, Facebook and almost every other major tech company or startup. This list contains no videos, books, or product placements — just articles. Read all of these articles to get your doctorate in Product Management.

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Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Practical Go — Real world advice for writing maintainable Go programs

This is Dave Cheney’s working document for his Practical Go workshop. So much wisdom shared. My goal over the next two sessions is to give you my advice for best practices writing Go code. This is a workshop style presentation, I’m going to dispense with the usual slide deck and we’ll work directly from the document which you can take away with you today. There’s also this page of the same name on his site, but I’m not sure if they’re directly connected.

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 Itamar Turner-Trauring codewithoutrules.com

On learning new technologies: why breadth beats depth

There’s always new technologies coming out, and learning them in-depth would take an impossible amount of time. But you can most of the benefit, and more efficiently, by focusing on learning just enough about a broad range of tools to know when they’re useful. You know I’ve been preaching breadth-first over depth-first for years now. In this post, Itamar breaks down why that’s a smart strategy for learning new technologies and lays out a few ways you can gain breadth of knowledge. Unfortunately, he omitted one of the best ways of gaining (and maintaining) breadth: listen to podcasts!

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Matt Dole artsy.github.io

So you want to be a software engineer

Are you or someone you know trying to move into the engineering department from a position that’s unrelated to software engineering at a company? …I wanted to pursue computer engineering. I’d been at Artsy for a bit less than two years at that point, first as a marketing intern working on SEO and then as a coordinator on the CRM (read: email) team. I’d consistently been working on small technical projects; first doing some work on a tool for SEO optimization for our Editorial team, then building emails with MJML, and a few other bits and bobs. But I didn’t think of it as a serious pursuit. It was Artsy’s Engineering team that convinced me that programming was something that I both wanted to and could do. Our engineers have always welcomed learners and been happy to answer questions and empower other teams to do technical work. I eventually realized that the parts of my work where I was coding were the parts I enjoyed the most, and that I would likely feel more fulfilled if I made programming my full-time occupation. (Gosh, that opening sounds like the first line of a pharmaceutical commercial. Sorry about that!)

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